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Harrison Middleton University believes that the study of the liberal arts is both timeless and timely because it focuses on the persisting questions of human existence and bears directly on the problems we face today. At a time when more and more adults are recognizing the benefits of lifelong learning, the Great Books of the Western World provides the medium in which to search for fundamental knowledge and unifying ideas.

Harrison Middleton University is a great books, great ideas, great conversations, distance learning university that offers undergraduate and graduate education in the humanities with concentrations in imaginative literature, natural science, philosophy and religion, and social science. Harrison Middleton University promotes student-faculty scholarship through research, discussion, and the development of collaborative publications.

HMU News

Congratulations to Adam Hazlett

Please join HMU tutors and staff in congratulating Adam Hazlett on the successful completion of his capstone project! For his applied project in partial fulfillment of his Doctor of Arts degree requirement, Adam created course curriculum that explores social, ethical, and moral questions through superhero cinematic mythology. The title of his project is, "God and State through Superhero Movies: Curriculum for the Freshmen Composition Classroom."

More HMU news

Upcoming Events

Film Series Discussion & Spring Quarterly Discussions

Join us for a film series discussion on Thursday, March 3rd, over Blade Runner which is a modified film adaptation of the 1968 novel Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? by Philip K. Dick. This discussion over both the film and text will be co-led by Gary Schoepfel, HMU Tutor/Great Books Chicago founder and Michael MacLean, HMU Tutor/science fiction film writer. For more information, email Rebecca Fisher (rfisher@hmu.edu).

The next Quarterly Discussion will be held Thursday, April 14th, and Saturday, April 16th, and we will read Kafka's Metamorphosis. Our discussions are open to the public and we invite new voices to listen and participate. Quarterly Discussions are conducted on a conference call, and you can be anywhere to participate! If you are interested in participating or would like more information, please email Alissa Simon (asimon@hmu.edu).

More upcoming events

HMU: Dialogues

November 2015 Bi-Annual Newsletter

Harrison Middleton University's bi-annual publication shares information about student graduations and publications, and celebrates student, faculty, and staff achievements!

Read the current edition of HMU: Dialogues

To receive our newsletter, please email information@hmu.edu.

HMU: Blog

Join the Conversation

At HMU, we want to continue the great authors' conversations in a contemporary context, and our blog will help us do that.

Visit our blog and join the conversation

Featured Graduate

James Keller, Columbia, SC

"Studying at Harrison Middleton has been one of the greatest pleasures of my life. One learns to read more intelligently by asking interpretive questions and relying on the text for answers. The process of shared inquiry keeps the mind from becoming an echo chamber and opens up the text through the insights and questions of others. I am eager to resume my studies with HMU."

– James Keller

Read more about James

View all of our featured graduates

Shared Inquiry

Selection from a Syntopical Discussion

The "Shared Inquiry" or Socratic method is at the heart of Harrison Middleton University's teaching methodology. Participants in the Shared Inquiry process search for meaning, for answers to fundamental questions of human existence raised by primary texts. In the course of conversation, students will work to interpret the primary text, employing critical skills, and bringing their own insights and experiences. Throughout their studies, students will have a series of one-to-one discussions (via telephone or Skype) with tutors over the coursework they designed. Click below to listen to a selection from a syntopical discussion between HMU Tutor Dr. Marcus Conley and HMU Ed.D. student John Reynolds. The discussion as a whole explores the Great Idea of Truth as addressed by authors such as Augustine, Barth, Locke, Bacon, Mill, and Descartes. In the following selection, the participants consider the different attitudes toward figurative language by Locke and Augustine, then begin to discuss the notion of discipline according to Descartes and Bacon.

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