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The Pins of Pinterest

August 18, 2017

Thanks to Alissa Simon, HMU Tutor, for today's post.

Recently, I was looking for some graphic that would help explain a few points about ancient Rome. My initial Google search sent me to mostly Pinterest sites. I thought that was interesting since I seldom use Pinterest. I did a little bit more digging and found some things that I wanted (both on and off Pinterest). But as I completed this process, I began to wonder about our reliance upon sites like Pinterest. It functions as an amalgam of posts, displayed as a stream of scrollable ideas which may fit your particular topic. It relies on pins, tags and keywords. As I navigated through the wide variety of pins, I wondered as to whether it was the best use of my time. So, today's blog is a result of my interest in Pinterest.

First off, the name is catchy, clever and witty. It combines function with interest. In other words, it is an online bulletin board that lets you pin only what you are currently interested in. You can create separate boards for each category of interest personal to you. The name relies on one of the oldest uses of “pin” - a small device used for fastening things. These boards enable you to follow other people, though, and have multiple topics all online (replacing that messy corkboard in the kitchen). So, now, your bulletin board of interests can be shared with friends, family or strangers. (It does allow you to create a personalized and private board just for you if you do not want to share everything.)

Pinterest supplies ideas that fill a specific need. They have recipes, lesson plans, craft projects, home decorating tips, how-tos and DIYs. This makes me wonder whether or not we are constantly replicating each other and if this replication is a problem? If we think of the way that the human imagination functions, I see that Pinterest can be both beneficial and harmful. For example, Pinterest is full of art projects and ideas. One can learn about a particular art form or medium simply by copying another's projects and in fact it is a good way to begin. Creative minds will be able to find creative ideas and expand upon them in any medium, I believe. To truly own the idea, however, one must not stop there. Copying allows only for skills and technique, but not necessarily creative thought. So, while the people on Pinterest supply ideas, the user must still transform that idea into a personal creative piece. In other words, Pinterest generates ideas, which is wonderful, but one must also generate ideas in order to advance.

The second issue that I find with Pinterest is misinformation. Of course, this problem is not reserved to Pinterest. Misinformation can be found all over the internet and is something that I mentioned in my article on blogs too. In the case of Pinterest, however, many teaching aides appear helpful, but I did find some with errors. Therefore, as with all information, it is best to do your own homework instead of simply relying on the first lesson that you find. Having said that, however, there is no need to reinvent the wheel. Those who have done the research and posted thoughtful lesson plans or worksheets offer a beneficial service to educators and families everywhere. When I began teaching, other teachers presented me with a slew of handouts. I was able to copy these at will. Pinterest offers the same thing, but with much better technology, better graphics and eye-grabbing appeal, all of which resonates with the contemporary classroom.

I find that, in general, the people of Pinterest are really creative and thoughtful, especially with their own interests. The communities built upon common pins reinforces connections with a community. However, it struggles with the same issues as blogs and Facebook. For one, everything revolves around marketing. Many sites ask for money and most contain pop-up advertisements. The advertisements often align with the pinned information. For example, if you have clicked on an idea about crafts, you might see an advertisement for a craft store. In other words, each pin unwittingly leaves a trail of information about you, the user. Also, by creating online communities that revolve only around our own interests, we may be limiting ourselves in unforeseen ways. It is worth thinking about the way that we construct both an online self and an online community. Are these the same as their public counterparts?

None of the pros or cons that I have listed means much of anything by itself. I simply like to think about the technology that we rely upon everyday, how it interacts with ourselves and the various hats we wear. How does this technology affect my life in unseen ways? What do we gain by using the newest trend? What do we lose? One final factor that I have not mentioned in any of these blogs on technology is the idea of time. Is the time spent online useful? Has it increased your ability to be a better person in any way? I find that, personally, there is a line. Some information is helpful, but endless searching is fruitless and wasteful. Where is your line regarding time spent navigating social media?

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