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Holiday Menus

November 23, 2018

Thanks to Alissa Simon, HMU Tutor, for today’s post.

“Cookery is the most ancient of the arts, for Adam was born hungry.” - Jean Anthelme Brillat-Savarin

I love cooking and so, naturally, I love old cookbooks. The holidays present a perfect time to rummage through my cookbooks. I learn so much about culture just from these pages. I also enjoy the pamphlets and chapbooks that small entities publish, such as church groups and non-profit organizations. Though some recipes are redundant, each publication adds a little flavor to the shelf. Today, I just wanted to share holiday tips from a variety of magazines and cookbooks over the last 100 years. As the years change, so does the style of food and the description of ingredients. It is fun to see recipes change from “a peck of potatoes” to “a pound of potatoes” and also to note changes introduced by accessibility to freezers, microwaves and other devices. If you have a favorite tradition or table setting, please, share it below!

Though it has no special section dedicated to Thanksgiving, the 1930 Better Homes and Gardens Cookbook explains, “At the formal dinner, butter is not served. None of the food is on the table when guests come into the dining-room. The napkin is on the service plate. Suppose the menu consists of a fruit cocktail, a soup, an entree, a main course, a salad, a dessert, and after-dinner coffee.”

From January 1951 article in EveryWoman Magazine. Article by Mary Grovesnor Ellsworth. Photo credit: Alissa Simon.

From January 1951 article in EveryWoman Magazine. Article by Mary Grovesnor Ellsworth. Photo credit: Alissa Simon.

Tucked inside a corner of this same cookbook, my grandmother saved an article by Mary Grovesnor Ellsworth titled “Blue Print for a Winter Party” from the January 1951 edition of EveryWoman Magazine. It recommends Jambalaya as the best holiday feast because it is a dish that “is much, much easier than pie – and that nobody will have had yesterday.” The page includes a map of footprints to guide your guests from serving table to dining tables and strictly advises that the traffic between kitchen and serving tables should never cross. She prepares everything the day before and suggests that men make the salad. Ellsworth writes, “The easiest and showiest way of coping with the salad is to dress it in the bowl. Men love to do this! It looks complicated and professional, is very easy to do, and actually produces a dressing that for some reason tastes different from the same ingredients combined before they hit the greens.”

A small book called the Foodorama Party Book, published by Kelvinator (at that time a division of American Motor Corps out of Detroit), 1959, contains recipes centered around frozen foods (which makes sense for Kelvinator, one of the first big names in freezers). For example, their Thanksgiving includes “Broccoli California” which is frozen broccoli cooked according to directions and topped with olive oil, garlic, almonds, and olives. To prepare for the feast, they write:

“The Thanksgiving table is set with your prettiest cloth and appointments. The ever-perfect centerpiece is that traditional symbol of a plentiful harvest: red cabbage, acorn and yellow squash, white and yellow onions, pumpkin, eggplant, green peppers, apples, grapes and oranges – all arranged on a tray lined with autumn leaves. … Simple family games for after dinner include Nut Throw (take turns pitching unshelled nuts into a bowl set a few feet away), Thanksgiving Day (make words from the letters in Thanksgiving Day), Nut Relay (push a nut along the floor over the finish line – but push only with your nose!).”

The Thanksgiving Feast suggested by Betty Crocker’s New Picture Cookbook (from 1961) is as follows: Roast Turkey, Bread Stuffing, Cranberry Sauce, Mashed Potatoes, Giblet Gravy, Creamed Onions, Mashed Squash, Carrot and Celery Curls, Ripe and Green Olives, Assorted Hot Rolls, Old-fashioned Mince Pie, and Autumn Pumpkin Pie. They also included a picture of their advised table setting (below).

Thanksgiving table setting according to  Betty Crocker’s New Picture Cookbook , 1961. Photo credit: Alissa Simon.

Thanksgiving table setting according to Betty Crocker’s New Picture Cookbook, 1961. Photo credit: Alissa Simon.

And finally, jumping up to 2007, in The Art of Simple Food, Alice Waters displays her love of entertaining with the following advice:

“Here are a few practices I employ to help me plan a menu, think it through, and cook it. These are critical for large gatherings and complex events, but they are useful for simple dinners, too. Once you have decided on the menu, make a game plan. First write out the menu and draft a shopping list. If, when you make the shopping list, you discover that the shopping, not to mention the cooking, is too complicated, go back and revise the menu – or see if anyone can help. … I also like to have a little something ready to nibble on when the guests arrive. This can be as simple as a bowl of warm olives or roasted nuts. I often make croutons topped with a tasty tidbit. Another of my favorite little somethings is a plate or bowl of freshly cut seasoned vegetables (carrots, fennel, radishes, celery, sweet peppers) served with nothing more than a sprinkle of salt and a squeeze of lemon.”

Whatever your holiday tradition or feast, enjoy! We wish you all the best.

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Post-Memorial

June 1, 2018

Thanks to Alissa Simon, HMU Tutor, for today’s post.

I know that Memorial Day 2018 already passed, but recently I have been rereading some of Standing Down, and felt the time was right for another moment of appreciation.

War inevitably involves great trauma and loss. As the following quotes demonstrate, wartime changes all races and peoples, ancient and modern. The world is not perfect, and will never be, but it is important to honor those who died for us with some sort of promise, hope or expectation of continual improvement, an effort for what is right, what is best, and what is just. I am not sure if anyone ever comes to terms with the effects of war, but I do believe that in writing and reading, these authors have left some important road maps for us to read. I believe that the passages quoted below cannot be read too often.

“He sat there on the porch reading a book on the war. It was a history and he was reading about all the engagements he had been in. It was the most interesting reading he had ever done...Now he was really learning about the war.” – Ernest Hemingway, “Soldier’s Home”

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“When Hector reached the oak tree by the Western Gate,/ Trojan wives and daughters ran up to him,/ Asking about their children, their brothers,/ Their kinsman, their husbands. He told them all,/ Each woman in turn, to pray to the gods./ Sorrow clung to their heads like mist.” – Homer, the Iliad, Book 6

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Talbot: “Thou antic Death, which laugh’st us here to scorn,/ Anon, from thy insulting tyranny,/ Coupled in bonds of perpetuity,/ Two Talbots, winged through the lither sky,/ In they despite shall scape mortality./ O thou, whose wounds become hard-favored Death,/ Speak to thy father ere thou yield thy breath!/ Brave Death by speaking, whether he will or no;/ Imagine him a Frenchman and thy foe./ Poor boy! He smiles, methinks, as who should say,/ Had Death been French, then Death had died today./ Come, come, and lay him in his father’s arms.”

[John is laid in his father’s arms.]

“My spirit can no longer bear these harms./ Soldiers, adieu! I have what I would have,/ Now my old arms are young John Talbot’s grave.” - Dies. – William Shakespeare, Henry VI, Part I

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“But, in a larger sense, we cannot dedicate – we cannot consecrate – we cannot hallow – this ground. The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it far above our poor power to add or detract. The world will little note nor long remember what we say here, but it can never forget what they did here. It is for us, the living, rather, to be dedicated here to the unfinished work which they who fought here have thus far so nobly advanced. It is rather for us to be here dedicated to the great task remaining before us – that from these honored dead we take increased devotion to that cause for which they gave the last full measure of devotion; that we here highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain; that this nation, under God, shall have a new birth of freedom; and that government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth.” – Abraham Lincoln, “Gettysburg Address”

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“When a man died, there had to be blame. Jimmy Cross understood this. You could blame the war. You could blame the idiots who made the war. You could blame Kiowa for going to it. You could blame the rain. You could blame the river. You could blame the field, the mud, the climate. You could blame the enemy. You could blame the mortar rounds. You could blame people who were too lazy to read a newspaper, who were bored by the daily body counts, who switched channels at the mention of politics. You could blame whole nations. You could blame God. You could blame the munitions makers or Karl Marx or a trick of fate or an old man in Omaha who forgot to vote.

In the field, though, the causes were immediate. A moment of carelessness or bad judgement or plain stupidity carried consequences that lasted forever.” – Tim O’Brien, The Things They Carried

**All citations come from Standing Down; From Warrior to Civilian, published by the Great Books Foundation in 2013.

 

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Euclidean Utopia

December 25, 2015

Today, the day that celebrates the birth of Jesus, presents the perfect opportunity to continue our discussion of utopia. To catch up on past conversations, visit the last blog posts about Utopia here: (Universal Spirit and Utopia  or Imperfect Ideal ).

Looking for Paradise”, a song by Alejandro Sanz and Alicia Keys, grounds today's discussion. Feel free to listen while reading: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oRFegcmOTPE. Sanz sings: “Estoy buscando ese momento....Todo el mundo va buscando ese lugar...Looking for Paradise”. (“I'm looking for that moment...The whole world is looking for that place...Looking for Paradise”). A single soul looking for paradise in both a single moment and single location.

Any discussion of utopia must begin from a focal point: an individual, for example. Some form of context allows us to navigate both time and space, which otherwise appears fluid. Reason creates an association to both time and space in chronological terms: in terms of past and present and future. Therefore, our sense of space is also chronological. Is there an alternative way to structure our society? Alfred Kroeber suggests that “[s]ince the day of the Roman empire and the Christian church, we hardly think of a social activity except as it is coherently organized into a definite unit definitely subdivided.”

Image ID: 60608956 Copyright: Mikhail Pogosov. Shutterstock.com

Image ID: 60608956 Copyright: Mikhail Pogosov. Shutterstock.com

Time is unavoidable. It allows for communication, structure and plan. It also allows us to think. There are certain, marginalized (and not well-understood) societies that speak in a language of perpetual present tense. Much like their lives, they do not discuss the future, and only abstractly narrate the past. Their past often involves deities, but not familial or ancestral members. These societies have structured their lives in a way different than mainstream societies. Language offers evidence of this structure, which reinforces the premise that we function in a pre-existing worldview, though we may not be aware of it. So, our solidly structured lexicon of past-present-future might actually hinder our engagement with an idea like utopia. We say utopia and simultaneously imply future utopia without even realizing it.

The I Ching states that “[a]ny journey is ruled by the twin houses of mystery and discovery.” But nowhere in there does it mention structure. Mystery, discovery, freedom: these are ideas opposed to structure. They function and regenerate in a world if not separate from, certainly opposed to, structure. We build a certain skill level, a certain art, when attempting to navigate either the completely new and foreign as well as a known and quantified social structure. Yet, we do create meaning from new environments by linking a new idea to an old, by assimilating characteristics and grouping like things together. In the Introduction to Euclid's Elements, he states, “Thus it is the province of Geometry to investigate the properties of solids, of surfaces, and of the figures described on surfaces.” So, if the figure we desire to define is utopia, then the path towards creation runs not through figures, but through events, through the most horrible and the most brilliant times of human history. These events have historically been the barometer of utopia.

Image: 46829242 Copyright: Onur ERSIN. Shutterstock.com

Image: 46829242 Copyright: Onur ERSIN. Shutterstock.com

In the article, “A Non-Euclidean View of California as a Cold Place to Be”, Ursula Le Guin, however, suggests that our current situation is our utopia. She says that we might not recognize it, but in searching for some linear, contract-bound society, we aim incorrectly. Instead, she suggests something like “perservering in one's existence as a completely worthy social goal”. It is interesting to note the proposition that the pursuit of self leads to a utopian society. The interplay of individual and society is important, and this quote asks us to look back at Kroeber's quote from the beginning...the map of social subdivisions as they emanate from ancient times. Instead of mapping new terrain, Le Guin asserts our right to celebrate the existence that we have, the pre-existing pathways inside each one of us that leads to something great.

In this theory, there are a frightening number of unknowns and perhaps a sad realization that utopia is not filled with chocolate and luxury. But as we discussed in previous blogs about utopia, the impossibility of creating hard and fast categories for every scenario, of defining happiness for a multitude of individuals, is everpresent. Perhaps utopia is singular, but enjoyed collectively. Perhaps it is this single moment (by which I mean any moment, not necessarily a holiday) spent in celebration of something we cannot quite comprehend. Through participation, we can and do enjoy. “Estoy buscando ese momento ... Todo el mundo va buscando ese lugar..."

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